Victims Denounce New Threats in Sucre

News from Colombia | on: Wednesday, 15 June 2011

Carmelo Agamez

Carmelo Agamez

The Sucre chapter of the MOVICE National Victims Movement has reported new threats against its members, Candelaria Barrios, Pedro Geney, and Franklin Torres. The threats follow on from others received on the 19th of May and 10th June, which told them and other MOVICE members to leave the area “or be executed once and for all.”

The latest threat was received by email on June 14th from an address that translates as “bloodruns2011@hotmail.com” and which read “we warned you and you didn’t listen. We publicly told you to leave the area and you didn’t pay attention, and now you’ll have to pay the consequences… our campaign ‘to build Colombia by killing a guerrilla’ continues. We didn’t want blood but you force us to… Candelaria Barrios Acosta, Pedro Geney, Franklin Torres, guerrillas disguised as human rights defenders, the order has no gone out to take you out.”

The threat was signed by the “Red Blood Anti-Guerrilla Force.”

The Sucre chapter of MOVICE has been victim of more than 100 attacks against its members since its foundation in 2006. Among them the killings of Rogelio Martinez on May 18th 2010, and Eder Verbel Rocha on 23rd March 2011. MOVICE Sucre has also been subjected to repeated threats, thefts, physical assaults and assassination attempts. Carmelo Agamez, one of the political prisoners JFC campaigns for, is also a leading member of MOVICE Sucre. He is currently imprisoned on charges of 'conspiracy to commit crime' and is being held in Corozal prison without having been convicted. He was arrested after exposing links between regional politicians and paramilitaries.

The latest threats coincide with MOVICE Sucre accompanying those people striving to return to their lands on the La Europa farm, which is currently illegally occupied by the Don Juanco Arepas Company. These kind of threats are the reason why many Colombian victims’ organisations have said the new Land and Victims law is insufficient, since it provides no security guarantees for those attempting to return to their lands.



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